Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Cheap Custom T-Shirts-Tips


There are several ways that you can make custom t shirts. One way is to use an iron on transfer. It is relatively easy to use and can even be done on your own printer. The problem with using an iron on transfer to create custom t shirts, however, is that they will tend to wear off as soon as you wash clothes. While iron on transfer may be cheaper, they often will only last a few washes before they begin to crack.

Screen printing is the art of making custom t shirts and other fabrics that look much more professional and will last for a lifetime wear t shirt. Screen printing process, however, used to be very expensive and if you want a custom t shirt, you have to order them in large quantities. It took a long time to set the printing press, which is why there are usually large amounts specified for this type of command.

There are types of screen printing to create custom t shirts that can be used when using a computer instead of the traditional screen printing process. This makes it more affordable for smaller organizations or even individuals to get custom t shirt printing professional quality without having to place a large order.

Try typing "custom t shirts no minimum", you can find a site that will not only give you the opportunity to create your own custom t shirts you, but it will also allow you to see what it looks like to make your site interactive. You can get a good idea of ​​where to place the artwork as well as the slogan and also experimented with different types of fonts and their sizes. Custom t shirts see on the screen, you'll have an idea of ​​what to expect when the item finally arrived at your home. You can choose from a variety of different colors and styles and sizes when you create a custom t shirt and it will not cost a lot of money. They quote a very spoiling your pocket, you do not need to order hundreds of items, just one item alone still be served.

Another way to create custom t shirts including embroidery. This allows for the design or letters to be sewn directly onto the shirt. This pretty much ensures that the design will continue as long as the shirt. Embroidery can also be found online and you can make your own custom t shirts or other garments even with this type of technique. The purchase of machines for doing this can be expensive, but if you order custom t shirts of small businesses that will make them for you, you can get what you want for much less than what you would pay in the store.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Galaxy Nexus now on sale in Google Play

We started shipping Nexus phones more than two years ago to give you a pure Google experience and access to the latest Android updates. Today, we’ve started selling Galaxy Nexus (HSPA+) from a new Devices section in the Google Play web store, so you can quickly and easily purchase an unlocked version of the phone. We want to give you a place to purchase Nexus devices that work really well with your digital entertainment.

Galaxy Nexus by Samsung runs the latest Android software, Ice Cream Sandwich, with Google mobile services, Google Play and new features like Android Beam and Google+ mobile hangouts. It also offers a 4.65” HD Super AMOLED display that’s perfect for watching movies, playing games or reading books on the go.

First available in the U.S., Galaxy Nexus costs $399 and arrives at your door unlocked, without a carrier commitment or contract. You can use it on the GSM network of your choice, including T-Mobile and AT&T. It also comes pre-installed with the Google Wallet app which lets you easily make purchases and redeem offers with a tap of your phone. Best of all, we'll give you a $10 credit to get you started with your new mobile wallet.

We’ve come a long way since the first Android devices started hitting shelves three and a half years ago and since the launch of the first Nexus device. More than 300 million Android devices have been activated globally. We’ve worked with developers and content partners to launch Google Play, offering more than 500,000 apps, millions of songs and books, and thousands of movies. And we’ve implemented new customer support services to improve the purchasing experience on Google Play. We’ve taken all of this into consideration in designing Devices on Google Play. We hope to bring it to more countries soon.

Posted by Andy Rubin, Senior Vice President of Mobile and Digital Content

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Chrome for Android Update

(Cross posted on the Google Chrome Blog)

Since we launched Chrome for Android Beta in February, we’ve been listening closely to all of your feedback (thank you!). It’s great to hear how so many of you love having the Chrome experience on your Android 4.0 phone or tablet.

With today’s update, Chrome for Android Beta is now available in 31 more languages and in all countries where Google Play is available. We’ve also added many much-requested features, including:

  • You can now request the desktop version of a website, in case you would rather not view the mobile version.
  • You can now add bookmarks as shortcuts on your home screen, so you can get to your favorite sites faster.
  • Choose your favorite apps to handle links opened in Chrome.
  • Have a proxy setup for Wi-Fi access? You can now use Chrome with the system proxy configured in Android settings.

If you build websites, you may want to take note of a change in the User-Agent specification for Chrome for Android.

If you haven’t already, you can install Chrome for Android Beta from Google Play on your Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) phone or tablet. As we're still in Beta, we look forward to your feedback so we can continue to improve Chrome for Android.

Posted by
Dan Alcantara and Oli Lan, Software Engineers on Chrome for Android

Friday, April 13, 2012

Android C2DM — Client Login key expiration

[This post is by Francesco Nerieri, engineering team lead for C2DM — Tim Bray]

In the upcoming weeks, some of the older Client Login authentication keys will expire. If you generated the token you’re currently using to authenticate with the C2DM servers before October 2011, it will stop working.

If the response from the C2DM servers contains an Update-Client-Auth header, you’ll need to replace the current token with the one included in the header.

  // Check for updated token header
String updatedAuthToken = conn.getHeaderField(UPDATE_CLIENT_AUTH);
if (updatedAuthToken != null && !authToken.equals(updatedAuthToken)) {
log.info("Got updated auth token from datamessaging servers: " +
updatedAuthToken);
serverConfig.updateToken(updatedAuthToken);
}

We suggest that you start using the Update-Client-Auth response header to update tokens regularly, as keys will expire periodically from now on. For example, have a look at the Chrome to Phone service hosted on code.google.com; this code takes care of authenticating via Client Login and then sending a message:

Alternatively, you can manually generate a new Client Login token now and replace the one currently in use. ClientLogin can be used with any application that can make an HTTPS POST request. The POST request should be structured as a form post with the default encoding application/x-www-form-urlencoded, like this:

POST /accounts/ClientLogin HTTP/1.0
Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

accountType=GOOGLE&Email=johndoe@gmail.com&Passwd=north23AZ&service=ac2dm

If the POST succeeds, the response contains the authorization token, labeled "Auth", which is your new token. You could even do this from the command line:

curl -d \
"accountType=HOSTED_OR_GOOGLE&Email=johndoe@gmail.com&Passwd=north23AZ&service=ac2dm" \
https://www.google.com/accounts/ClientLogin | \
grep Auth

If your request fails or if you are prompted for captchas, please read ClientLogin for Installed Applications. And of course, if you updated your code to use the Update-Client-Auth header after the keys had expired, then you will first need to manually generate a new token.

Have fun with C2DM!

Thursday, April 12, 2012

New Seller Countries in Google Play

Over the past year we’ve been working to expand the list of countries and currencies from which Android developers can sell their products. Starting today, developers in Czech Republic, Israel, Poland, and Mexico can sell priced applications and in-app products on Google Play, using their local bank accounts for payments. Welcome developers!



If you develop Android apps in one of the new countries and want to get started selling them, visit play.google.com/apps/publish and set up a new Google Play developer account. Once you’ve uploaded your apps, you can price them in any available buyer currencies, publish, and then receive payouts and financial data in your local currency.



If you are based in Israel or Mexico and are currently selling apps through an AdSense merchant account, you will need to migrate your apps to a new Google Play developer account in your local currency. Watch for an email that provides complete information on the migration process and timeline.



Additionally, we encourage developers everywhere to visit the Developer Console as soon as possible to set prices for their products in the currencies of these new countries. Stay tuned for more announcements soon as we continue to roll out our new billing infrastructure to buyers and sellers throughout the world.



Join the discussion on

+Android Developers



Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Google Currents goes international

In December we launched Google Currents, an app for Android and iOS devices that lets you explore online magazines and other content with the swipe of a finger. We’re thrilled by how many readers and publishers are using the app in the U.S. -- nearly 400 publisher editions and over 14,000 self-produced editions are now available.

After the U.S. launch, the top features readers requested were to make the app available internationally and to allow content to sync quickly. We’ve heard you, and today we’re making Google Currents 1.1 available around the world. Hundreds of U.S. editions are now readable in your preferred language with a new publisher-selected translation feature, and local publishers can begin adding their content to the catalog through Google Currents Producer. Plus, a new dynamic sync feature improves your reading experience with fresh content wherever you are.

Whatever you’re interested in -- whether it’s science (Popular Science, Scientific American, Space.com), sports (Bleacher Report, CBS Sports, Surfer), business (Harvard Business Review, Inc.), celebrities (Celebuzz, HollywoodLife, Now magazine, TMZ), health & wellness (Men’s Health, Yoga Journal), design (Colossal, Dwell) or news (The Atlantic, PRI, Slate) -- it’s easy to find a great edition to read in Google Currents.

Read in more places

With this update, we’ve made Google Currents available globally, wherever apps are available on Google Play and the Apple App Store. International publishers, using Google Currents Producer, can now begin adding local content for an international audience, choosing where to make it available globally and whether to enable auto-translation. For example The Guardian in the UK, LaStampa in Italy, Financial Times Deutschland in Germany, ABC News in Australia, Neue Z├╝rcher Zeitung in Switzerland and Hindustan Times in India have already started publishing editions with local content. Readers can also add their favorite local blogs which are instantly converted into Currents editions.

Read in your favorite language

To help you enjoy content in your preferred language, we’ve integrated Google Translate into Google Currents. Just press the globe icon while reading an edition, and you can automatically translate that edition to one of 38 supported languages. So it’s easier than ever to keep up with Italian and German sports (Corriere dello Sport, kicker.de), or read Scientific American, in your preferred language.

Read fresh content, automatically

With our new dynamic sync feature, you’ll always have fresh content to read. As you open each edition, new content is dynamically delivered, using a minimum of your phone or tablet's battery, bandwidth and storage. Those of you who travel on planes and trains can choose which editions you would like fully packaged for offline reading, including images.

Learn more about what’s new in Currents here.

Google Currents is now available for download on Google Play and in the Apple App Store, wherever apps are available. Whether you’re a reader or a publisher, we hope that Google Currents helps you easily experience the best content on the web, now in even more languages.

Posted by Mussie Shore, Product Manager

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Accessibility: Are You Serving All Your Users?

[This post is by Joe Fernandez, a technical writer for developer.android.com who cares about accessibility and usability. — Tim Bray.]

We recently published some new resources to help developers make their Android applications more accessible:

“But,” you may be thinking, “What is accessibility, exactly? Why should I make it a priority? How do I do it? And most importantly, how do I spell it?” All good questions. Let’s hit some of the key points.

Accessibility is about making sure that Android users who have limited vision or other physical impairments can use your application just as well as all those folks in line at the supermarket checking email on their phones. It’s also about the Mom over in the produce section whose kids are driving her to distraction, and really needs to see that critical notification your application is trying to deliver. It’s also about you, in the future; Is your eyesight getting better over time? How about that hand-eye coordination?

When it comes down to it, making an application accessible is about having a deep commitment to usability, getting the details right and delighting your users. It also means stepping into new territory and getting a different perspective on your application. Try it out: Open up an application you developed (or your all-time favorite app), then close your eyes and try to complete a task. No peeking! A little challenging, right?

How Android Enables Accessibility

One of main ways that Android enables accessibility is by allowing users to hear spoken feedback that announces the content of user interface components as they interact with applications. This spoken feedback is provided by an accessibility service called TalkBack, which is available for free on Google Play and has become a standard component of recent Android releases.

Now enable TalkBack, and try that eyes-closed experiment again. Being able to hear your application’s interface probably makes this experiment a little easier, but it’s still challenging. This type of interaction is how many folks with limited vision use their Android devices every day. The spoken feedback works because all the user interface components provided by the Android framework are built so they can provide descriptions of themselves to accessibility services like TalkBack.

Another key element of accessibility on Android devices is the ability to use alternative navigation. Many users prefer directional controllers such as D-pads, trackballs or keyboard arrows because it allows them to make discrete, predictable movements through a user interface. You can try out directional control with your apps using the virtual keyboard in the Android emulator or by installing and enabling the Eyes-Free Keyboard on your device. Android enables this type of navigation by default, but you, as a developer, may need to take a few steps to make sure users can effectively navigate your app this way.

How to Make Your Application Accessible

It would be great to be able to give you a standard recipe for accessibility, but the truth of the matter is that the right answer depends on the design and functionality of your application. Here are some key steps for ensuring that your application is accessible:

  1. Task flows: Design well-defined, clear task flows with minimal navigation steps, especially for major user tasks, and make sure those tasks are navigable via focus controls (see item 4).

  2. Action target size: Make sure buttons and selectable areas are of sufficient size for users to easily touch them, especially for critical actions. How big? We recommend that touch targets be 48dp (roughly 9mm) or larger.
  3. Label user interface controls: Label user interface components that do not have visible text, especially ImageButton, ImageView, and EditText components. Use the android:contentDescription XML layout attribute or setContentDescription() to provide this information for accessibility services.

  4. Enable focus-based navigation: Make sure users can navigate your screen layouts using hardware-based or software directional controls (D-pads, trackballs and keyboards). In a few cases, you may need to make UI components focusable or change the focus order to be more logical.

  5. Use framework-provided controls: Use Android's built-in user interface controls whenever possible, as these components provide accessibility support by default.

  6. Custom view controls: If you build custom interface controls for your application, implement accessibility interfaces for your custom views and provide text labels for the controls.

  7. Test: Checking off the items on this list doesn’t guarantee your app is accessible. Test accessibility by attempting to navigate your application using directional controls, and also try eyes free navigation with the TalkBack service enabled.

Here’s an example of implementing some basic accessibility features for an ImageButton inside an XML layout:

<ImageButton
android:id="@+id/add_note_button"
android:src="@drawable/add_note_image"
android:contentDescription="@string/add_note_description"/>

Notice that we’ve added a content description that accessibility services can use to provide an audible explanation of the button. Users can navigate to this button and activate it with directional controls, because ImageButton objects are focusable by default (so you don’t have to include the android:focusable="true" attribute).

The good news is that, in most cases, implementing accessibility isn’t about radically restructuring your application, but rather working through the subtle details of accessibility. Making sure your application is accessible is an opportunity to look at your app from a different perspective, improve the overall quality of your app and ensure that all your users have a great experience.